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Last updated on Jul 7th, 2020 at 01:59 pm

For all the latest news about the coronavirus, click here.

New research has found that COVID-19 can cause cardiac injury, even in patients without underlying heart conditions…

It’s known that COVID-19 can have fatal consequences for people with underlying cardiovascular disease,  but even in people without underlying heart conditions, the virus can cause cardiac injury.

This is according to a review by health experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

It is likely that, even in the absence of previous heart disease, the heart muscle can be affected by coronavirus disease,” says Mohammad Madjid, MD, MS, the study’s lead author and an assistant professor of cardiology at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth.

“Overall, injury to the heart muscle can happen in any patient with or without heart disease, but the risk is higher in those who already have heart disease.”

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COVID-19 linked to heart failure

The study authors explained that research from previous coronavirus and influenza epidemics suggest that viral infections can cause acute coronary syndromes, arrhythmias, and the development of, or exacerbation of, heart failure.

In a clinical bulletin issued by the American College of Cardiology, it was revealed that the case fatality rate of COVID-19 for patients with cardiovascular disease was 10,5%.

Data also points to a greater likelihood that individuals over the age of 65 with coronary heart disease or hypertension can contract the illness, as well as experience more severe symptoms that will require critical care.

According to the study authors, critical cases are those that reported respiratory failure, septic shock, and/or multiple organ dysfunction or failure that resulted in death.

“It is reasonable to expect that significant cardiovascular complications linked to COVID-19 will occur in severe symptomatic patients because of the high inflammatory response associated with this illness,” says Madjid, who also sees patients at the UT Physicians Multispecialty – Bayshore clinic.

https://www.all4women.co.za/1981901/health/illnesses/covid-19-make-this-your-personal-disinfecting-routine

What can you do?

Current COVID-19 treatment options are being researched, and there is a large effort to develop vaccines for prevention and to test antivirals for the treatment of the disease.

In the meantime, the study authors encourage all individuals to consult with their health care providers about being vaccinated against influenza and that at-risk patients seek advice on receiving a pneumonia vaccine from their primary care physician.

While these vaccines will not provide specific protection against COVID-19, they can help prevent superimposed infections alongside COVID-19.

Source: University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston via www.sciencedaily.com

 

For all the latest news about the coronavirus, click here.

While All4Women endeavours to ensure health articles are based on scientific research, health articles should not be considered as a replacement for professional medical advice. Should you have concerns related to this content, it is advised that you discuss them with your personal healthcare provider.