“Reality Check” is an article series which looks at common mistakes people make when they begin dieting for weight loss. We’ll check out some ‘thought adjustments’ that will help you make better choices on your journey. The articles include tips, new ideas to try, strategies to follow, and encouragement to keep you moving forward.

What is a ‘healthy’ body weight, anyway?

“I just want to diet DOWN to a ‘healthy’ bodyweight. I’ve got a bit of flab that I need to get rid of, you know?”  

Through the media, we’ve been brain-washed into believing that a healthy body is a very thin body. The gold standard? ABZZZ! (Abdominal muscles visible through your skin). Lots of health and weight loss influencers promote the idea that in order to have the perfect body, you must be able to see your abs!

So, how true is all of this?

Are you really at the peak of your health once you’re a welter-weight? Almost certainly not. You see, there are a rew problems here. The first one is that if you’re super skinny, then you’re probably not carrying much muscle, which means you’re not very strong. That’s a smaller problem now, but a very large one when you’re older and you fall down and can’t stand back up again.

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The next issue is that if you’re really light, then you’ve probably starved yourself to get there. This means your body is running on almost no real nutrition. That can’t lead to a healthy internal environment.

So what IS a healthy body weight?

Well, that’s hard to nail down, because everyone is different. The best way to figure out what a healthy, sustainable body weight for YOU is to see a professional diet and nutrition coach. They will evaluate your body, your needs, and your potential and they will give you a realistic goal to aim for.

Don’t make “abs” your primary goal!

Aim for good nutrition, strength and reasonable fitness. Your body will undergo major changes, and you’ll see some really encouraging results.

 

Read more in the ‘reality check’ series below:

 

While All4Women endeavours to ensure health articles are based on scientific research, health articles should not be considered as a replacement for professional medical advice. Should you have concerns related to this content, it is advised that you discuss them with your personal healthcare provider.