If you love to colour your hair and use straighteners, we have bad news – research has found that this increases your breast cancer risk…

From rich chocolate brown to honey blonde and then ravishing red, colouring your hair can be a fun way to completely change your look.

Unfortunately, using permanent hair colour has its drawbacks and an increased risk of breast cancer is one of them.

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health found that women who use permanent hair dye and chemical hair straighteners have a higher risk of developing breast cancer than women who don’t use these products.

They also found that the more frequent use of these chemical hair products, the higher the risk.

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Over 46 000 women studied

This research was based on data from 46 709 women in the Sister Study, researchers at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS).

They found that women who regularly used permanent hair dye in the year prior to enrolling in the study were 9% more likely than women who didn’t use hair dye to develop breast cancer.

Among African American women, using permanent dyes every five to eight weeks or more was associated with a 60% increased risk of breast cancer as compared with an 8% increased risk for white women.

Women who used hair straighteners at least every five to eight weeks were about 30% more likely to develop breast cancer

Deadly superbugs could be lurking in your make-up bag

What about semi-permanent hair colour?

Fortunately, there is some good news for anyone who loves colouring their hair – the research team found little to no increase in breast cancer risk for semi-permanent or temporary dye use.

The truth about straighteners

The research team found that women who used hair straighteners at least every five to eight weeks were about 30% more likely to develop breast cancer.

Although the researchers say that it’s too early to make a firm recommendation, avoiding these chemicals might be one more thing women can do to reduce their risk of breast cancer.

Signs of breast cancer (other than a lump)

Source: NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences via www.sciencedaily.com