The Duke of Sussex partnered with National Geographic to become Guest Editor of the National Geographic  Instagram account on Monday 30th September, as people from all over the world are encouraged to ‘look up” and share the beauty of trees…

Working with Nat Geo Magazine Editor in Chief, Susan Goldberg, The Duke of Sussex took over the controls of the Nat Geo Instagram account, which reaches over 122 million followers, to curate a new set of beautiful images of forest canopies, all taken by National Geographic photographers.

This partnership celebrates the beauty and significant environmental importance of conservation, as two more national parks are created as part of the Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy campaign, during Prince Harry’s royal tour in Southern Africa.

 

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Photo by @sussexroyal | We are pleased to announce that Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex @sussexroyal is guest-curating our Instagram feed today! “Hi everyone! I’m so happy to have the opportunity to continue working with @NatGeo and to guest-curate this Instagram account; it’s one of my personal favourites. Today I’m in Liwonde National Park, Malawi an important stop on our official tour of southern Africa, planting trees for the Queens Commonwealth Canopy. As part of this takeover, I am inviting you to be a part of our ‘Looking Up’ social campaign. To help launch the campaign, here is a photograph I took today here in Liwonde of Baobab trees. “#LookingUp seeks to raise awareness of the vital role trees play in the Earth’s ecosystem, and is an opportunity for all of us to take a moment, to appreciate the beauty of our surroundings. So, join us today and share your own view, by looking up! Post images of the trees in your local community using the hashtag #LookingUp. I will be posting my favourite images from @NatGeo photographers here throughout the day, and over on @sussexroyal I will be sharing some of my favourite images from everything you post. I can’t wait to see what you see when you’re #LookingUp 🌲 🌳” ••• His Royal Highness is currently on an official tour to further the Queens Commonwealth Canopy, which was launched in 2015. Commonwealth countries have been invited to submit forests and national parks to be protected and preserved as well as to plant trees. The Duke has helped QCC projects in the Caribbean, U.K., New Zealand, Australia, Botswana, Malawi, and Tonga. Now, almost 50 countries are taking part and have dedicated indigenous forests for conservation and committed to planting millions of new trees to help combat climate change. The Duke’s longtime passion for trees and forests as nature’s simple solution to the environmental issues we face has been inspired by the work he has been doing on behalf of his grandmother, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, for many years.

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Forest conservation

The Duke’s love of trees has led him to become a key champion of Queen Elizabeth II’s unique forest conservation project: “The Queen’s Commonwealth Canopy” which Her Majesty launched at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Malta in 2015.

Commonwealth countries were invited to submit forests and national parks or plant trees to preserve, in perpetuity, in The Queen’s name.  Now, almost 50 countries are taking part and have dedicated indigenous forest for conservation or have committed to planting literally millions of new trees.

Look up

“Looking Up” celebrates the beauty of trees and the important role they play in the earth’s eco-system.  It highlights the symbiotic relationship humans and wildlife have with the trees that are fundament to our survival.

 

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Photo by @simoncroberts | “The autumn colours in the U.K. are always beautiful, and I just had to include something to show them off. Thanks to Simon Roberts for sharing this. It was taken at the National Arboretum, which makes it even more special.” —Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex @sussexroyal Selected by The Duke for the #LookingUp campaign with @natgeo, Simon’s image was taken at the National Arboretum, in Gloucestershire, England, which is a year-round centre of remembrance for those who have served their country. Please keep sharing your own #LookingUp images from your own community, and at the end of the day The Duke will be sharing some of his favourites on @sussexroyal Instagram stories. … Today, The Duke of Sussex @sussexroyal is guest-editing the @natgeo feed, in an effort to raise awareness around Queens Commonwealth Canopy, in which almost 50 countries have dedicated indigenous forest for conservation or have committed to planting millions of new trees to combat climate change. The images being posted today are all ‘looking up’ at trees from below to highlight the vital role trees play in the Earth’s ecosystem. Post your images of trees, add #lookingup, and at the end of the day, The Duke will share a selection of images that you post from across the world on @sussexroyal Instagram stories

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Photo by @franslanting | “Baobab trees are my all-time favourite. There’s something so unique and special about them—which is why I’ve been a bit cheeky and included them twice in my takeover today! This giant of the African forest is the tree of life, supporting everything from the largest mammals to the tiniest creatures. I especially love #LookingUp and seeing them in Botswana, where Frans Lanting has taken this beautiful picture.” –Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex @sussexroyal Frans’s photograph was taken on Kubu Island in Makgadikgadi Pans, Botswana. Please keep sharing your own #LookingUp images from your own community, and at the end of the day The Duke will be sharing some of his favourites on @sussexroyal Instagram stories. … Today, The Duke of Sussex @sussexroyal is guest-editing the @natgeo feed, in an effort to raise awareness around Queens Commonwealth Canopy, in which almost 50 countries have dedicated indigenous forest for conservation or have committed to planting millions of new trees to combat climate change. The images being posted today are all ‘looking up’ at trees from below to highlight the vital role trees play in the Earth’s ecosystem. Post your images of trees, add #lookingup, and at the end of the day, The Duke will share a selection of images that you post from across the world on @sussexroyal Instagram stories

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Photo by @beverlyjoubert | “My final post of the day in this takeover of @natgeo, and I’m finishing with a picture by Beverly Joubert of an African elephant, Loxodonta Africana, pulling on a tree branch to graze under the setting sun in Botswana. I am really grateful to @natgeo for handing over the reins of their feed to help raise awareness of trees, and show just how beautiful they are but also highlight how important they are to the Earth, and to all of us. Thank you to everyone who has been posting their own images from their own communities. I’ll be heading over to @sussexroyal to report some of my favourites. Thank you, and remember to keep #LookingUp!” – Prince Harry, The Duke of Sussex @sussexroyal

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