It takes time to unlearn bad habits, and while your children do, try to remember that they are privileged to have doting grandparents in their life…

There’s nothing quite like the love between a grandparent and grandchild.

It’s an indulgent type of love; the kind that leads to over-stocked pantries, a disregard of rules and loads and loads of presents just for ‘because’.

At grandma’s; ‘no’ is not a word, bedtime is a flexible concept, and, routine? What’s that?!

It would make sense then, that children resist any form of ‘normality’ once they return home…

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The ‘grandparent withdrawal’ is real

Yes, the ‘grandparent withdrawal’ is real, and it usually manifests itself in the form of a sulking, whining, rule-defying, uncooperative child.

Know what we’re talking about?  Here are three tips to survive it:

1. Start slowly

There’s no doubt that your children were spoiled rotten during their time at grandma’s.

Think endless sugary snacks, little-to-no expectation to tidy up (ever!) and as many hours of Peppa Pig as they wanted!

Expecting your children to come off that high cold turkey is going to be hard for them – and for you.

Like any detox, it’s best to start slow. Ease them back into normality and compromise where you can – like obliging to read ‘just one more bedtime story’.

2. Be firm

Grandparents are anything but firm, and even an initial ‘no’ can be swayed by puppy eyes and a cute pout!

As your children detox from the free-for-all living that they experienced at their grandparents’ house, they’re bound to try their luck with you at home.

Stand firm in your non-negotiables (whether that’s finishing their vegetables, tidying up after themselves or adhering to your screen time rules) and remind them, that what mom says, goes.

3. Know, that this too shall pass

It takes time to unlearn bad habits, and while your children do, try to remember that they are privileged to have doting grandparents in their life.

Like all difficult stages, the ‘grandparent withdrawal’, too shall pass.