Screen time and a lack of sleep could be the reason why your kids are acting impulsively and making bad decisions

These are the findings from research by Healthy Active Living and Obesity Research Group (HALO) at the CHEO Research Institute in Ottawa.

Impulsive behaviour is associated with numerous mental health and addiction problems, including eating disorders, behavioural addictions and substance abuse,” says Dr Michelle Guerrero, lead author and postdoctoral fellow at the CHEO Research Institute and the University of Ottawa.

“This study shows the importance of especially paying attention to sleep and recreational screen time, and reinforces the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth. When kids follow these recommendations, they are more likely to make better decisions and act less rashly than those who do not meet the guidelines.”

Why some parents are banning screen time

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No more than 2 hours of recreational screen time a day

The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth recommend:

  • Nine to 11 hours of sleep a night
  • No more than two hours of recreational screen time a day
  • 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily

Over 4 000 children studied

Researchers analysed data for 4 524 children from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) Study, which will follow participants for 10 years.

In addition to sleep and screen time, the ABCD Study also captures data related to physical activity. Physical activity is the third pillar of the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines, which recommend at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity daily.

Source: University of Ottawa via www.sciencedaily.com

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