Last updated on Jun 22nd, 2021 at 02:53 pm

Short on time? High-intensity interval training can help you burn fat in less time, but will it affect your sleep if you do it in the evening?

We’ve heard there are benefits of starting the day with exercise, but not everyone can work out in the morning. As for evenings, many people the idea of exercise after work exhausting.

The good news is that high-intensity interval training can help you burn fat and build muscle in less time. However, the belief that high-intensity exercise in the early evening negatively affects sleep puts many people off.

Thankfully, new research has found that 30 minutes of high-intensity exercise performed in the early evening does not negatively affect sleep and may even reduce feelings of hunger.

Workouts for weight loss: Does interval training work?

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High-intensity exercise reduces hunger-stimulating hormone

Researchers at Charles Sturt University in Australia recruited 11 middle-aged men to complete three experimental trials to investigate sleep and appetite responses to exercise performed in the morning (6 – 7 am), afternoon (2 – 4 pm) and evening (7 – 9 pm).

New research has found that 30 minutes of high-intensity exercise performed in the early evening does not negatively affect sleep and may even reduce feelings of hunger

Participants were required to perform high-intensity cycling involving six one-minute, maximal intensity sprints interspersed by four minutes of rest.

Blood collections were taken prior to exercise and following exercise to examine appetite-related hormones, and multiple tests were performed during sleep to assess sleep stages.

The results not only showed that evening exercise did not have a detrimental impact on subsequent sleep, but also that afternoon and evening high-intensity exercise were associated with greater reductions of the hunger-stimulating hormone, ghrelin.

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Source: The Physiological Society via www.sciencedaily.com

While All4Women endeavours to ensure health articles are based on scientific research, health articles should not be considered as a replacement for professional medical advice. Should you have concerns related to this content, it is advised that you discuss them with your personal healthcare provider.