If you’re on a weight-loss plan, then your body and your future weight-loss goals need to be on the same page!

But sometimes, some of the things we’re doing to help us lose weight, can actually be counter-productive! They can actually end up making you gain weight because of the messages you’re sending to your body through your actions.

Healthy weight loss is not about limiting your calories to the point where you starve.  Or just eating cabbage soup. HEALTHY weight loss is about a balanced approach to your diet and entire lifestyle. It is something that you should be able to implement for years to come, not just a short-term, potentially risky solution.

Here are four things to watch out for if you want your metabolic rate to stay elevated while you are on a healthy diet.

1.     Don’t starve yourself

While a diet is really all about consuming fewer calories, too little food can be just as detrimental as too much!

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Eating too little causes your body to switch into a ‘starvation mode’. And because it thinks you’re in a famine, it will store as much energy as possible, regardless of how few calories you’re eating.

It does this so that you have spare energy to live on when the food runs out. This is ancient programming that you’re not going to get around very easily, so the key is to avoid this state by eating enough food to lose weight, not too little or too much.

A good place to start is 500 calories per day lower than you would need to maintain your current weight. You can work out how many you need by using one of the numerous calorie calculators or apps that are available online.

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While All4Women endeavours to ensure health articles are based on scientific research, health articles should not be considered as a replacement for professional medical advice. Should you have concerns related to this content, it is advised that you discuss them with your personal healthcare provider.