Getting an adequate amount of fibre in your diet in today’s world is a tough ask…

Most processed and refined foods contain far less fibre than what our diets require, and as such, the average person doesn’t get enough.

This is a problem both for general health and for weight loss.

What’s the big deal about fibre?

Having enough fibre in your diet helps with regular bowel movements, and overall digestive health (reducing the risk of bowel cancer). It also helps you to feel fuller for longer after a meal, and helps balance out blood sugar levels. It has even been shown to help improve cholesterol levels.

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So fibre is important. REALLY important.

And when it comes to weight loss, having enough fibre in your diet means that your body will be working optimally. Good digestion means a flatter stomach. Fibre also makes you fuller for longer – reducing your cravings, and potential binge-eating.

Here’s how you can get enough fibre so you can lose more weight, and be more healthy too.

 

1.     Start your day the wholegrain way

Making sure that your body gets enough fibre throughout the day is important. So start the day with a high-fibre breakfast. In order to do this, you’ll want to get some wholegrains onto the menu. This could be in the form of oats – preferably as whole as possible – or some wholegrain bread.

Don’t overdo the quantity here, one or two slices of bread or around 40g of oats is sufficient. Also, combine the wholegrains with some protein to balance out the meal, and provide a slower digestive pace for extended energy reserves and stable blood-sugar levels.

Peanut Butter Power Oats recipe

Click page 2 below for more info on how to get more fibre and lose more weight…

While All4Women endeavours to ensure health articles are based on scientific research, health articles should not be considered as a replacement for professional medical advice. Should you have concerns related to this content, it is advised that you discuss them with your personal healthcare provider.