A mum has told how she has watched her five-year-old daughter learn to walk four times due to injuries caused by their shared brittle bone condition…

The little one must now avoid running or jumping for fear of breaking her limbs. Stacy Mason, 36, from Evansville, Indiana, was born with Type V osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a brittle bone condition characterised by a susceptibility to fractures – and passed the gene on to her daughter, Paige.

Her little girl broke her first bone at nine months old when she was learning to stand. While trying to pull herself up on a coffee table, she fell down and broke her tibia (shinbone) in her right leg after landing on it. Paige is now five years old and has had 13 fractures already.

At the age of 34, Stacy has experienced over 25 broken bones throughout her lifetime. The first bone break happened at four months old.

Sadly, there is no known cure for the condition from which the mom and daughter suffer. However, various treatments can help slow down the breakdown of the bones. Paige and her mom both visit the hospital regularly to have infusions of bisphosphenates to prevent loss of bone density.

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Viral birthday cards

In 2016, Paige went viral after her mom sent out a request on Facebook for friends and family to post birthday cards to Paige. She also posted the request on a Facebook page she manages which raises awareness about brittle bone disease. Paige is too fragile to have a birthday party with friends, but her mom still wanted to make her day special.

According to Stacy, Paige gets very excited when the mailman arrives, and always asks if there’s any post for her. That’s what sparked Stacy’s idea to request birthday cards in the mail. The post went viral quickly, and instead of just a few dozen cards, Paige was inundated with over 6 000 birthday cards from around the world! Piage is requesting birthday cards again this year… see the social media post below.

The mom and daughter continue to help raise awareness of their disease, and other brittle bone diseases through social media, documenting their progress together.

 

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