Last updated on Mar 12th, 2021 at 01:44 pm

It is heartbreaking to know that people with dementia in a care home experience just two minutes of social interaction a day

This is according to the Improving Staff Attitudes and Care for People with Dementia e-Learning (tEACH) study.

The study, which involved 280 residents and care staff in 24 care homes over nine months, aimed to improve resident well-being and staff attitudes to person-centred care.

“Just take a moment to imagine life with just two minutes of social interaction each day. To accept this is discrimination against people with dementia. We urgently need to do better,” says lead researcher Professor Clive Ballard, of the University of Exeter Medical School.

They found that an e-learning programme that trains care home staff to engage in meaningful social interaction with people who have dementia improves their well-being and has sustained benefits.

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Just take a moment to imagine life with just two minutes of social interaction each day. To accept this is discrimination against people with dementia – Prof Clive Ballard, University of Exeter Medical School.

The Wellbeing and Health for people with Dementia (WHELD) programme trained care home staff to increase social interaction from two minutes a day to 10. It involves simple measures such as talking to residents about their interests and involving them in decisions about their care.

“Most care home training programmes are not evidence-based. We know our programme works over the long term, and we now know it can be delivered remotely. We now need to roll this out to care homes,” says Prof Ballard

To learn more about the programme, watch the following video…

 

Source: University of Exeter via www.sciencedaily.com

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