Go ahead and whip up a delicious omelette because, despite what you may have been told, eggs don’t increase the risk of heart disease…

We’ve heard it for years – eggs are bad for cholesterol levels and could increase the risk of heart disease.

Now, despite this dietary advice, research has found that eating up to 12 eggs a week does not increase cardiovascular risk factors.

What happens when you eat an egg-rich diet?

For the University of Sydney study, led by Dr Nick Fuller, participants aimed to maintain their weight while embarking on a high-egg (12 eggs per week) or low-egg (fewer than two eggs per week) diet.

The same participants then embarked on a weight-loss diet for an additional three months, while continuing their high or low egg consumption.

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For a further six months – up to 12 months in total – participants were followed up by researchers and continued their high or low egg intake.

At all stages, both groups showed no adverse changes in cardiovascular risk markers and achieved equivalent weight loss – regardless of their level of egg consumption, Dr Fuller explained.

Eggs are a source of protein and micronutrients that could support a range of health and dietary factors

Eggs are excellent

“Despite differing advice around safe levels of egg consumption for people with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes, our research indicates people do not need to hold back from eating eggs if this is part of a healthy diet,” Dr Fuller said.

“A healthy diet as prescribed in this study emphasised replacing saturated fats (such as butter) with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (such as avocado and olive oil),” he added.

Dr Fuller said the findings of the study were important due to the potential health benefits of eggs for people with pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes, as well as the general population.

“Eggs are a source of protein and micronutrients that could support a range of health and dietary factors including helping to regulate the intake of fat and carbohydrate, eye and heart health, healthy blood vessels and healthy pregnancies.”

Source: University of Sydney via www.sciencedaily.com

Related: Give up one thing to reduce type 2 diabetes risk