Vaginal hygiene products do more harm than good, according to a new University of Guelph study…

A survey of nearly 1 500 Canadian women revealed that women who use these products are three times more likely to experience some type of vaginal infection.

“While research has shown douching can have negative impacts on vaginal health, little was known about the dozens of other products out there,” says psychology professor Kieran O’Doherty, the study’s lead investigator.

“These products may be preventing the growth of the healthy bacteria required to fight off infection.” – Professor Kieran O’Doherty

Products linked to yeast infections

Women who used gel sanitisers were eight times more likely to have a yeast infection and almost 20 times more likely to have a bacterial infection.

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Those using lubricants or moisturisers were two and half times as likely to have a yeast infection.

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Products linked to urinary tract infections

Women using feminine wipes were twice as likely to have a urinary tract infection.

Women using feminine washes or gels were almost three and a half times more likely to have a bacterial infection and two and a half times more likely to report a urinary tract infection.

Vaginal hygiene products disrupt healthy bacteria

Prof O’Doherty says emerging medical research has linked disruption of vaginal microbial systems with health problems.

“These products may be preventing the growth of the healthy bacteria required to fight off infection.”

Pelvic inflammatory disease, cervical cancer, reduced fertility, ectopic and pre-term pregnancies, and bacterial- and sexually transmitted infections are among the problems related to an abnormal vaginal microbiome, he says.

Source: University of Guelph via www.sciencedaily.com

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