While you may be tuned into every sneeze, cough or cry, there are other symptoms that pop up which you might not be familiar with…

New parents always struggle to judge whether symptoms can be treated at home or it’s time to visit the emergency room. With so many viral infections roaming the air and little immune power to combat these ailments, the possibility of your child landing up in the hospital is high.

While you may be tuned into every sneeze, cough or cry, there are other symptoms that pop up which you might not be familiar with. In these cases, it’s better to get professional advice than leave it.

For example, what kind of tummy ache is serious? What can be classified as a ‘high’ fever? How to distinguish between a tummy bug with vomiting and diarrhoea or something more serious?

If all of these questions are zooming through your head, here is some health advice about your precious little one:

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High fever

Especially in infant babies, a fever is never a good sign. Because it’s so easy for a young baby to pick up an infection, the chances of it spreading are high because there is little their bodies can do to fight it. One of the instant signs of a virus needing professional attention is a spike in fever and one that lingers for more than three days. The older a baby gets, the easier it is to treat at home.

Especially in infant babies, a fever is never a good sign

A headache

There are various reasons why a child will complain of a headache. Some of the most common causes are a cold or flu, allergies, not enough food, poor or little sleep, and too much time spent in front of the TV. In most cases, these are the causes which can be treated at home. But if your child starts to complain about headaches for longer than a day, are vomiting from the pain or are starting to experience a blurred vision, you may need to consult a doctor.

Rashes

If you’re unaware of your child’s allergies and they’re experiencing rashes that are either sore or itchy, it’s important to have them checked out before applying any antihistamine cream. Creams for adults might be too strong on a child’s skin, so make sure you give them the correct medication they need.

Sometimes rashes can lead to vomiting and further side effects if not treated properly and in good time, so always inspect your child’s body for any sores or rashes that could be concerning.

Unusual or changing moles

Children like to spend plenty of time in the sun which could lead to freckles, moles or even early skin disease if you don’t apply sunblock throughout the day. Remember that children’s skin is extremely delicate, so anything can damage it.

Monitor your child’s skin condition for any changing moles or spots that were not there before.

Remember that children’s skin is extremely delicate, so anything can damage it

Sudden stomach pain

A bearable stomach ache is something that isn’t too concerning, but when the pain is in a particular area that is sudden and extremely painful for your child, make sure you keep watching and communicating with them about that pain. While you might think that the pain of something is specific to an area, it differs from person to person and can easily migrate without you being able to pinpoint it. Other common pains can be related to their bowel movements, so ensure they’re going to the toilet often enough not to cause constipation. If your child doesn’t visit the toilet regularly, they could land up in hospital.

Much like any of these red-flag symptoms, children can easily go to the hospital because of a problem, especially because they aren’t aware of the severity of a condition. Try and make sure that if that is ever the case, they’re signed up with a reputable broker that offers affordable hospital plans in South Africa. Knowing that you don’t need to stress financially over these hiccups will put you at ease.

Pain while urinating

Many girls get urinary tract infections from bubble bath or harsh soaps that are too perfumed for their bodies. If your daughter (or son for that matter) experiences pain when urinating, then you should get some medication to ease the pain before it spreads to their kidneys. The worse it gets, the more like it is to spread, causing you to need antibiotics for them.

Trouble focusing

If your child has problems focusing, try and monitor their symptoms before you take them to the doctor. Often when children are squinting at the TV, have difficulty in reading and more, they’re struggling to see. Poor vision can easily be identified as other conditions, so make sure you take your child for an eye test if you experience anything similar to these issues.

Don’t make the mistake of leaving something too long before seeking professional care

Stiff neck

Your child might have fallen or hurt themselves at preschool, resulting in a stiff neck, but usually a stiff neck accompanied by other symptoms means that there could be an inflammation or fever causing the stiffness. Other reasons could be related to flu, causing them to be cranky and sensitive to light. Whatever the cause is, these symptoms are very closely aligned, so don’t make the mistake of leaving something too long before seeking professional care.

It’s always better to be safe.

 

While All4Women endeavours to ensure health articles are based on scientific research, health articles should not be considered as a replacement for professional medical advice. Should you have concerns related to this content, it is advised that you discuss them with your personal healthcare provider.