Neurologists dispute Joost van der Westhuizen's 'revolutionary cure'

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Joost van der Westhuizen recently made the startling revelation that his motor neuron disease (MND) has been cured with revolutionary treatment, but neurologists across the country are saying this is impossible.
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In an effort to establish the credibility of the former Springbok rugby player's claims, Beeld approached a number of neurologists, who all had the same damning response

"It is a death sentence of an illness," Pretoria neurologist Dr. Joe Terblanche told the publication.

"We can't give MND-sufferers hope. We only walk the road with them until the end and make it as comfortable and painless as possible."

Fellow Pretoria doctor, Manesh Pillay concurs, saying of MND: "It is widely and commonly accepted as terminal and incurable. "

And so does Free State neurologist, Dr. Liesl Smit, who said: "It is very definitely incurable. I wish it wasn't, but there really is nothing that we can do for it."

Identified by Van der Westhuizen as Anton Neethling, Beeld also went searching for more information and found that Joost's revolutionary healer claims to have a PhD in theology from an American university

Asked to describe himself, he explained: "I am a pastor who walked away from the church in search of answers about why people get so sick and die."

Neethling - who runs a "health centre" in Pretoria - is not a registered member of South Africa's alternative medicine health body, the Allied Health Professions Council

Registrar for the council, Dr. Louis Mullinder, said they have never used or approved any of the devices the good doctor uses for either his "frequency" or "bio-electromagnetic" treatments.

Van der Westhuizen's miracle treatment involved a liquid diet, and he has reportedly for some time been receiving "bokserum" injection, for which there exists no documented or published proof of medical use.

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